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Nutrition

Tryptophan Top 10 to Sleepy Time

Planning a good nights sleep is what you can choose to do when putting together a meal plan that meets your daily goals for intake, weight loss or maintenance.  Here are your top 10 sleep inducing foods: Tryptophan is an essential amino acid and produces niacin and creates seratonin in the body.  Seratonin is known for aiding in sleepiness and mood elevation.  

Seeds and Nuts (Pumpkin or Squash)

Soya Foods 

Cheese, specifically reduced fat mozerella 

Lean Beef and Pork

Chicken and Turkey

Fish

Shellfish

Uncooked Oatbran and Oats

Lentils and Beans

Eggs

 

 

Know Your Fiber Sources

High Fiber Diet Yields Benefits  (Compliments of Merck Engage)

If you're looking to eat a healthier diet—and, by the way, potentially reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and some cancers—adding fiber can help.

In fact, most adults in the United States eat only 15 grams of fiber a day or less—well under the 21 to 38 grams a day recommended for normal adults. And the Institute of Medicine recommends taking in 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories you need.

2 types of fiber

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High Protein Convenience

ClearlyCuisine2

No time to cook?  Want to be pampered?  Like to eat well?  Clearly cuisine dishes up a flavorful 6 minute entree.

Salmon, Go Wild!

WildSalmonDoug815C

Salmon is known for being high in Omega 3's.  Do know that not all salmon is created equal.

Powerful Protein, Your Weight Loss Help-mate

Websalmon  Empower your daily menu with protein first to shed those hard to lose pounds    and keep them off.   The best sources—fish, meat, dairy, beans—aren't as quick or  convenient as most carbs or even fruits and veggies. "Traditional protein sources  aren't usually grab and go. And if they are, they're often fried or unhealthy," says  nutrition expert Angela Ginn, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic  Association.

That may help explain why up to a third of women between the ages of 20 and 40 don't get their RDA of protein, according to the most recent data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. And in light of the fact that a growing number of nutritionists believe that the current dietary guidelines for this mighty macronutrient are way too low, we're really missing out.

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